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Mastering Nutrition

Hi, I'm Chris Masterjohn and I have a PhD in Nutritional Sciences. I am an entrepreneur in all things fitness, health, and nutrition. In this show I combine my scientific expertise with my out-of-the-box thinking to translate complex science into new, practical ideas that you can use to help yourself on your journey to vibrant health. This show will allow you to master the science of nutrition and apply it to your own life like a pro.
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Now displaying: Page 1
Feb 27, 2020

Question: What does it mean when histamine intolerance and blood sugar dysregulation occur together?

Well, if his blood sugar is no longer as stable and he has histamine intolerance, then that drug probably interferes with vitamin B6 metabolism. Let me try to take one minute to see if I can find quick information on this. I can't. I can't find it quickly.

My instinct is to say that the drug is affecting vitamin B6 metabolism on the basis that 80% of the vitamin B6 in the body is used for glycogen metabolism in liver, which is the thing that stabilizes your blood sugar between meals. If your blood sugar is not stable between meals any longer, then yeah, it could be a hormonal thing. What it really probably means is that there's something wrong with the liver's ability to store glycogen or to access the glycogen when it's stored because your blood sugar is stabilized between meals exclusively by the liver's glycogen metabolism.

How does that relate to histamine intolerance? They're both caused by B6 deficiency. That's my take. I'd measure his blood levels of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Off the top my head, I believe LabCorp has a test for that. It would be helpful to look at his excretion of xanthurenate, kynurenate, and quinolinate in organic acids test. The Genova ION has all three of those. I don't think the other one is available to have all three. But every urinary organic acids test has some of those. I would go from there.

I mean, if you want to save money, just trial a pyridoxal 5’-phosphate, which is the active form of B6. Trial a supplement of that to see if it helps. I would do that at, maybe start with 10 milligrams, but feel free to work up slowly over a few weeks to 100 milligrams. If a few weeks at 100 milligrams doesn't treat that and he's off the drug, then there's something else going on and I don't know what it is. But that would definitely be first line thinking for me. Thank you, Jennifer, for your question. I'm glad that was helpful.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

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